Archive for Advertising

How to Insert SoundCloud’s Player in ThingLink Tags

Cool video of how to set up a SoundCloud player in ThingLink tags. There’s a post on my music site about ThingLink, an innovative company that I’m working with.

Read music marketing master Michael Brandvold’s post on ThingLink.

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FTC Guidelines on Endorsements and Testimonials

If you’re a blogger getting paid to post, you’re now going to have to disclose it. The social Web is under Federal Trade Commission (FTC) scrutiny. I have worked with several mommy bloggers with very high integrity. A few, however, were running pay for post operations — printing product reviews in exchange for cash — without revealing payments. That is influence gone awry. Now the FTC has put bloggers on notice with a requirement to disclose payments or promotional consideration related to such reviews.

The Federal Trade Commission recently approved final revisions to the guidance it gives to advertisers on how to keep their endorsement and testimonial ads in line with the FTC Act.

The notice incorporates several changes to the FTC’s Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising, which address endorsements by consumers, experts, organizations, and celebrities, as well as the disclosure of important connections between advertisers and endorsers. The Guides were last updated in 1980.

Under the revised Guides, advertisements that feature a consumer and convey his or her experience with a product or service as typical when that is not the case will be required to clearly disclose the results that consumers can generally expect. In contrast to the 1980 version of the Guides – which allowed advertisers to describe unusual results in a testimonial as long as they included a disclaimer such as “results not typical” – the revised Guides no longer contain this safe harbor.

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CLIENT NEWS: GloPos Announces Technology That Makes All Mobile Phones Location Aware

PrintGloPos today announced its software-only positioning technology that makes all mobile phones location aware — outdoors, indoors, and even underground.

GloPos Technology requires only a cellular network to make all mobile phones location aware. No additional hardware like GPS or W-LAN is required on a mobile device for achieving accurate positioning.

“By making all phones location aware, GloPos Technology is set to revolutionize the indoor positioning and social location market, including mobile search and personalized mobile advertising. This will massively expand the positioning market,” said Mikael Vainio, CEO. “GloPos is a superior solution versus W-LAN and GPS-based indoor positioning applications which today serve less than 20 percent of the total yearly 1.3 billion unit mobile device market,” Vainio added.

GloPos’ patent-pending, self-learning algorithms calculate an accurate position fix to within 1-40 meters even in places where no W-LAN access points are available or no GPS can be used (i.e. in shopping malls, subways, underground parking, airports, sports arenas, and exhibition centers). GloPos works wherever cellular network coverage is available.

GloPos Technology does not consume any extra battery life while operating as cell information is already being used to stay connected. GloPos enables longer device usage versus GPS and W-LAN, allowing battery power to be used for more advanced applications and driving more powerful processors.

GloPos co-founders have over 20 years combined mobile experience with Nokia and Ericsson. CEO Mikael Vainio brings to GloPos more than a decade of executive experience with Nokia and Ericsson. Before joining GloPos he served in Ericsson Middle East HQ as Vice President Strategy, Marketing and Communications. Vice-President Alexander Le Bell has held executive positions with leading mobile and technology companies, including Ericsson, Nokia and Philips. He was Ericsson’s Director for Strategy and Business Intelligence for the Middle East. Prior to that he served in Nokia Multimedia, managing the operator business in Central Europe with some of the largest operators in the world, including T-Mobile, Vodafone and O2-Telefonica.

For more information visit: http://glopos.com.

About GloPos

GloPos was founded in 2009 to bring its new and innovative indoor positioning technology to the mobile consumer marketplace. GloPos is a technology spin-off company of 4TS Corporation, an innovative Finland-based company that develops location- and sensor-based technologies and solutions.

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How Advertising is Being Impacted by Internet, Social Networks, Online Viewing

6a00d8341c50bf53ef011570fa51b7970c-800wiFrom Josh Bernoff at Groundswell:

More changes are coming to the advertising marketplace due to the impact of the Internet, social networks and online viewing.

A recent survey by Forrester speaks to new data from marketers on their expected ad buys with respect to direct mail, television, magazines, outdoor, newspapers, and radio ad buying.

“70% expected the effectiveness of channels like created social media, online video, and mobile marketing to increase. The result is that digital, which will be about 12% of overall advertising spend in 2009, is likely to grow to about 21% in five years. Along the way overall advertising budgets will decline. This is huge.

It means we are all digital marketers now, since digital is at the center of many campaigns anyway. It means media is in trouble, or at least in the middle of a transformation. For example, online video ads, which will be about $870 million this year, will grow to over $3 billion in 2014. What will this do to networks plans to put more of their shows online in places like Hulu. How will it accelerate some newspapers plans to become more and more centered around online?

And it means that social “media”, which will account for $716 million this year between social network campaigns and agency fees, will generate $3 billion in five years. And this doesn’t even count displays ads on social networks (which are in the display ads category.) Of all the parts of digital marketing, social network marketing one is poised for the most explosive growth. Pundits have been declaring the end of mass media and advertising for years now. From my 14 years of experience analyzing this stuff, I’ve learned that things die very slowly, but there are real trends you can see. If you’re in advertising, you’d better learn to speak digital, because that’s the way the world is going.”

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SF MusicTech Summit Hits The Spot

IMG_0097Fourth time’s a charm? Maybe. The 2009 SF MusicTech Summit really hit the spot this year. Organizers Brian and Shoshana Zisk brought together a who’s who of music industry executives, managers, musicians, promoters and lawyers, to discuss the current state of the industry and how it should move forward. Topics covered included technology – tools artists and labels can use for marketing, promotion and measurement, and monetization – new models and legal issues related to how music will be delivered and paid for in the future.

There has never been more opportunity for musicians to take control of their careers. Recording and career promoting technologies are now in the hands of the artist rather than the record label. At the same time, there is lots of competition out there among artists. Someone in the band also needs to wear the hat of a ‘creative director’ for it’s often superlative creative marketing across new platforms (i.e. MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, etc.) that helps gain attention for an artist and his/her music and can make the difference and help elevate music among its intended audiences.

There was a terrific mid-day performance by songwriter/singer Matt Morris, whose new album is produced by Justin Timberlake. My friend and triple-Grammy winning record producer / hit-maker Narada Michael Walden showed up at the post-conference reception to promote Let The Sunshine In, a benefit concert taking place on May 25th in San Francisco, featuring Sting, Earl Klugh, Bob Weir, Dave Grisman, and many others.

This year’s’ event was standing room only…and I suggested to Brian that it might be time for a larger venue. One more thing…there was nobody on the floor I met who was bummed out about the economy. People were excited and optimistic.

(PIC: S. Neil Vineberg, Narada Michael Walden, Brian Zisk, )

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Did Coca-Cola Invent Santa Claus?

lg_santa_19311Did Coca-Cola invent the image of the modern-day Santa Claus – a white haired man in red clothes who delivers holiday gifts to kids? Not exactly. But they popularized Santa and ingrained into our mindsets that very image.

Here’s some history, thanks to the the St. Nicholas Center.

1804 — John Pintard, influential patriot and antiquarian, who founded the New York Historical Society in 1804, promoted St. Nicholas as patron saint of both society and city.

1809 — Washington Irving joined the society and on St. Nicholas Day that year he published the satirical fiction, Knickerbocker’s History of New York, with numerous references to a jolly St. Nicholas character. This was not a saintly bishop, rather an elfin Dutch burgher with a clay pipe. These delightful flights of imagination are the origin of the New Amsterdam St. Nicholas legends: that the first Dutch emigrant ship had a figurehead of St. Nicholas; that St. Nicholas Day was observed in the colony; that the first church was dedicated to him; and that St. Nicholas comes down chimneys to bring gifts.

Irving’s work was regarded as the “first notable work of imagination in the New World.”
The New York Historical Society held its first St. Nicholas anniversary dinner on December 6, 1810. John Pintard commissioned artist Alexander Anderson to create the first American image of Nicholas for the occasion. Nicholas was shown in a gift-giving role with children’s treats in stockings hanging at a fireplace. The accompanying poem ends, “Saint Nicholas, my dear good friend! To serve you ever was my end, If you will, now, me something give, I’ll serve you ever while I live.”

The jolly elf image received a big boost in 1823, from a poem destined to become immensely popular, “A Visit from St. Nicholas,” now better known as “The Night Before Christmas.”

1931 – Coca-Cola started to use Santa in a ‘good-feeling’ marketing campaign. So, in fact, Coke mainstreamed the idea of Santa Claus and laid the foundations of the giant gift-buying extravaganza it is today. I would image all kinds of marketers had the same idea as Coke.

Well, even though it was/is a marketing play, still it’s fun. So have a very Merry XMAS. And spend lots of money. Retailers need your support.

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Instant Soup of Thoughtful

20127591Before there were news sources like cable news, Twitter and the Internet, we had TV network news and print newspapers keeping us informed. I’d categorize the current and former as short form and long form news.

Twitter has distilled news and sound bytes to 140 characters. Cable news has shrunk it to a 30 second headline and story that repeats every 30 minutes. TV network news and the Internet still retain longer form story lines and exposition that give depth, breadth and context to a story. Unfortunately, the trend is toward short-form online news, and print newspapers are finding it hard to monetize their operations. In fact, folks like me are scanning the headlines of hundreds of news feeds a day as a way of staying in touch with various subjects important to my business and personal interest.

Experts predict that print newspapers will cease to exist as we know them. I’m sure the NY Times will still be around for a Sunday morning read, but a majority of small papers, might die for lack of advertising. Remember what happened to local news when Clearchannel bought your local radio station? The same might happen. Will that also mean the end of long form news?

My friend, Alexander Van Elsas, explores the immediacy of news in his blog and asks the right questions: “What if everything becomes immediate. What if the news is there right now, delivered faster than the blink of an eye. What if we all can have 24×7 contact and interaction. What if the “instant” has become part of the plumbing of the Internet? If “instant” becomes the norm, then it will decline in value. If everyone has instant access to the same information, the act itself becomes less valuable.”

I don’t have as much of a problem with the need for instant everything as much I do with the absence of story exposition. If all we have time for is instant and short form information bursts become news, will we lose depth of thought? Yes, books will always fill the void. But I want more than the drone of cable news and 140 character riffs on Twitter.

If newspapers disappear and we opt for instant on, I do hope the Internet accommodates deep thought in meaningful ways and that we make the time for it.

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