Posts Tagged Shambhu

GUITARIST SHAMBHU RELEASES DEBUT “SACRED LOVE”

“It’s the project I had on the shelf and it emerged thanks to a decline in the economy, which gave me personal time to discover and create this music,” says Shambhu, who’s debut CD, Sacred Love was released today.

Described as a “soul-elevating and magical journey, like riding a perfect wave,” Sacred Love features an all-star list of Grammy award-winning collaborators brought together by Shambhu, including Windham Hill Records founder Will Ackerman (co-producer) and recording and mixing engineer Corin Nelsen.

One reviewer praises Sacred Love as “possibly the best project Will Ackerman has ever been involved in.” The other artists that Shambhu and Ackerman assembled are no less impressive. They include: Tony Levin on bass (tours with Peter Gabriel), George Brooks on saxophone (recorded with John McLaughlin and Zakir Hussain), Ravichandra Kulur (tours with Ravi Shankar and Anoushka Shankar), Jeff Haynes on percussion (toured with Pat Metheny), Celso Alberti on drums (toured with Steve Winwood), Charlie Bisharat on violin (toured with Shadowfax), Premik Tubbs on flute and windsynth (toured with Santana and Mahavishnu Orchestra) and Eugene Friesen on cello (toured with Paul Winter Consort).

With the economy faltering, Shambhu decided to embark on a journey that many would have considered unthinkable. Putting his public relations business on the side for a year, he assembled the creative team and all-star artists behind Sacred Love, thereby finally realizing his life’s passion of creating a CD of his own music, and dedicated this effort to his 87-year-old mother who did not expect to live through the making of the CD due to health issues. Thankfully she is still alive enjoying this music, the realization of her dream, too.

“Each song on Sacred Love is a journey and the music flows with space for listener self-discovery and reflection,” Shambhu said. “That is thanks to decades of meditative practice with Indian mystic Sri Chinmoy, and my personal intention to infuse each note on the CD with love.”

Shambhu added, “The world needs oneness now more than ever. It is realistic and practical to believe that if we lead with love through the actions of our lives – and in my case, through the music of my life – we can help bridge the misunderstandings that separate people across religious, cultural and national boundaries, and create a world of oneness.”

Watch a 25-part YouTube series, “The Making of Sacred Love” at youtube.com/shambhumusic.

Buy Sacred Love at SacredLoveCD.com.

Visit Shambhu at ShambhuMusic.com

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Shambhu Sacred Love is Live


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FTC Guidelines on Endorsements and Testimonials

If you’re a blogger getting paid to post, you’re now going to have to disclose it. The social Web is under Federal Trade Commission (FTC) scrutiny. I have worked with several mommy bloggers with very high integrity. A few, however, were running pay for post operations — printing product reviews in exchange for cash — without revealing payments. That is influence gone awry. Now the FTC has put bloggers on notice with a requirement to disclose payments or promotional consideration related to such reviews.

The Federal Trade Commission recently approved final revisions to the guidance it gives to advertisers on how to keep their endorsement and testimonial ads in line with the FTC Act.

The notice incorporates several changes to the FTC’s Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising, which address endorsements by consumers, experts, organizations, and celebrities, as well as the disclosure of important connections between advertisers and endorsers. The Guides were last updated in 1980.

Under the revised Guides, advertisements that feature a consumer and convey his or her experience with a product or service as typical when that is not the case will be required to clearly disclose the results that consumers can generally expect. In contrast to the 1980 version of the Guides – which allowed advertisers to describe unusual results in a testimonial as long as they included a disclaimer such as “results not typical” – the revised Guides no longer contain this safe harbor.

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Enjoy the Love at Shambhu Music

Enjoy beautiful new age guitar music by Shambhu at ShambhuMusic.com. Learn more about Shambhu.

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Is that blogger review really a paid ad? The FTC wants you to know.

050727_mb_Payolacolor_tnThe Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is stepping into the practice of paid posts on the blogosphere and it’s about time. I have personally been solicited by several mommy bloggers who shall remain anonymous willing to write only for cash.  Pay-to-play schemes among mommy bloggers have been commonplace, it is akin to payola in the record industry, and it does a disservice to other bloggers.

Newsweek just wrote a story on the topic, “Trusted Mom or Sellout? How some mommy bloggers are being co-opted by corporate concerns.”

Decades ago there was a crackdown on payola in the music industry as record promoters paid off radio DJs to spin their records and popularize artists. The practice has largely been curtailed, although payments are still made under the table to DJs in major markets. Brands have been willing to shower freebees on bloggers in exchange for editorial coverage that fails to attribute the gifts and their influence. It stinks and it’s corrupting the blogosphere.

According to Consumer Reports:

“The FTC is updating its “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising,” which were last refreshed in 1980. What this has to do with bloggers is a new form of advertising, called word-of-mouth marketing, in which advertisers pay your favorite bloggers to “review” their products. The bloggers get paid, for example, with free product samples; gift certificates for JCPenney shopping sprees; cash payments; or the loan of a $30,000 Ford Flex for a year.

The bloggers are supposed to write whatever they want about the product—pro or con—but the payments put into question whether they would be inclined to seriously bite the hand of a “friend” lending a car or giving other valuable goodies or cash.

Last December social media blogger Chris Brogan shared on his blog that he was taking cash from Panasonic to visit the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) as their guest. Chris, who I like, rationalized that it was OK to take that cash for travel, hotels and meals, because he liked the idea of attending CES “for free,” he was going to hang with other professional colleagues who were doing the same thing, and he was honest and open about it. Therefore, it was ethical. Of course and no surprise, Chris later blogged about Panasonic which felt like a quid pro quo to me. That’s the problem. If I am going to trust Chris Brogan as an unbiased source but he is taking cash from companies he blogs about, his credibility and reputation go in the trash can.

Years ago I took a reporter from Newsday for lunch to talk about my company. That reporter refused to allow me to pay even for a sandwich and a soda. Why? Reporters at Newsday are disallowed from taking  free anything from companies and their PR reps. Bravo!!!

The FTC is right to investigate and they should extend this investigation far and wide.

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